Internet Travel With Context
May 24-May 30, 2020
Read all about it! As the national Coronavirus death toll surges past the 95,000 100,000 mark, holiday travel "surges" back to about 13 percent of 2019's numbers. Some international travel resumes, but new bans are instituted, too. Here's how we're covering it. The latest items are at the top. Read up from the bottom for context.

Coronavirus Update for May 27, 2020

There are now at least 100,000 deaths in the United States officially attributed to Coronavirus. South Korea has 269. In mid-March, the United States and South Korea both had slightly under 100 deaths each. Here are today's travel developments:
        Roll dem bones Nevada begins reopening the state in phases. Casinos, in Phase 2, are due to reopen on June 4. But the state notes that the Phase 2 plans exclude adult entertainment, brothels, nightclubs and live sports with an audience.
        Flying blind After a travel boomlet that pushed Memorial Day traffic to the dizzying heights of 13.5 percent of last year's volume, the TSA reported that about 264,000 people passed through airport checkpoints on Tuesday. That's 10.8 percent of 2019's similar-day volume. (Tuesday is traditionally the slowest travel day of the week.) The future of flying for the rest of the spring? Unknown.
        Spain expects its tourism sector, which represents 12 percent of the country's GDP, to reopen on July 1. There will be no quarantines required, at least for Schengen Zone residents.
        Air France will permanently end three domestic routes from Paris/Orly: Nantes, Lyon and Bordeaux. The cancellations are part of the terms of the French government bailout, which demands Air France stop flying domestic routes in competition with the TGV rail network. No announcements yet on route cancellations from Paris/CDG, Air France's global hub.
        Shelter from the storm How do you stay at home if you're homeless? The Philadelphia Inquirer offers a photo essay on homeless people who sheltered at Philadelphia's Terminal A.

Coronavirus Update for May 26, 2020

About 340,000 people passed through TSA checkpoints on Monday. That's 13.5 percent of 2019 traffic on a similar day, the best performance since travel bottomed out on April 14. Before you cheer, here's the context: It took about 40 days (March 6 to April 14) to go from around 2.1 million daily travelers to 88,000. In about 40 days since April 14, it "rebounded" to 340,000. Here are the other developments:
        Southern discomfort South America's largest carrier, LATAM, placed most of its subsidiaries in bankruptcy. South America's second-largest carrier, Avianca, already declared bankruptcy.
        Keep moving Hong Kong chief executive Carrie Lam says Hong Kong International Airport will reopen to transit passengers on June 1. No further details available yet.
        We're closed! Eurowings, the German carrier, restarted flights to Olbia Airport on Sardinia. The problem? Olbia Airport is still closed, which, you know, was troublesome for the arriving flight. Details are here.
        Universal Orlando reopens June 5 with a warning that getting the Coronavirus is on you. There will be temperature checks and guests will be required to wear masks.
        Thello, one of the two rail services between Italy and France, resumes some service on June 4.

Coronavirus Update for May 25, 2020

Today is Memorial Day, when we honor the dead of American wars. But this year the honored died in a war against a virus that some states and the federal government now seem content not to fight. Here are today's developments:
        Salad fixings The TSA says 267,451 people passed through airport checkpoints on Sunday. That is about 80,000 less than highest number of post-pandemic flyers, but the highest percentage (12.9%) compared to a similar day last year. Consider that green shoots if you must, but I won't wait on my salad.
        Uh-oh States such as Arkansas, which never issued a stay-at-home order, and North Carolina, still heavily restricted, are experiencing Coronavirus spikes and hot spots. Ironically, President Trump attacked the Democratic governor of North Carolina today for opening too slowly. He's demanding an immediate guarantee that August's planned Republican Convention in Charlotte can operate at full capacity.
        Brazil ban The Trump Administration says it is banning visitors and immigration from Brazil because of its high rate of Coronavirus infection. Which would be sound practice if the Administration also was banning visitors from countries with higher per capital rates of infection than Brazil.
        India chaos India reopened its aviation sector today (local time). It didn't go as planned. Reuters has details.
        Air New Zealand has begun reopening its airport lounges. However, buffet service is off, no alcohol is available and occupancy will be limited.

Coronavirus Update for May 24, 2020

The New York Times devoted its entire front page today to names of Americans who have died from Coronavirus. Nothing else, just names. It'll be 100,000 before the Memorial Day weekend ends. That's worth remembering. Here are today's developments:
        After the boom The TSA says 253,190 people passed through airport checkpoints on Saturday. Numerically, that's a fall of nearly 100,000 from Friday. But that's to be expected given it was a Saturday, always a slower day. More notable: It was 11.9 percent of 2019 traffic, down substantially compared to Friday's 12.4 percent. If traffic were truly booming, as some wags insist, the year-on-year percentage shouldn't be falling.
        Seattle-Tacoma Airport served 260,000 passengers in the month of April, down 93.6 percent compared to last year and comparable to SEA's traffic in 1967.
        Air Canada has resumed flying to United States. It is serving six cities--New York/LaGuardia, Washington/Dulles, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Boston and Chicago/O'Hare--down from 53 before the pandemic.
        Too little, too late The government's decision to stop flights from Europe was too little too late and left too much room for travelers infected with Coronavirus to enter the country. The Washington Post has details.
        Nope, nope nope, nope If you're wondering why this doesn't feel like the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, consider: No baseball or basketball playoffs. The French Open, scheduled to open today, was cancelled. And car racing's Indianapolis 500 and Monte Carlo Grand Prix won't run.

Coronavirus Update for May 17-May 23, 2020

Read all about it! As the national Coronavirus death toll surges past the 85,000 90,000 95,000 96,000 mark, all eyes are on the states that opened quickly. Will their infection and death rates spike? Asia deals with zero tourism as bans on visitors continue. European countries sweat the decisions to open to some tourism. Flying is still down more than 90 percent compared to 2019, but surges for Memorial Day. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for May 10-May 16, 2020

Read all about it! The nationwide Coronavirus death toll surges past the 75,000 80,000 85,000 88,000 mark. European countries make plans for slow, phased openings. The United States is more chaotic. Airlines and airports go beyond masks to temperature checks. Travel is picking up--if you squint and squeeze the numbers. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for May 3-May 9, 2020

Read all about it! The nationwide Coronavirus death toll surges past the 65,000 70,000 75,000 78,000 mark. We enter the era of the masked flyer. New York closes its subways for the first time ever. Airline losses keep piling up. Traffic doesn't. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for April 26-May 2, 2020

Read all about it! The nationwide Coronavirus death toll surges past the 50,000 55,000 60,000 65,000 66,000 mark. Some states loosen restrictions while European countries will keep things closed into the summer. U.S. airline traffic begins to nudge up as airline earnings plunge. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for April 19-April 25, 2020

Read all about it! The nationwide Coronavirus death toll surges past the 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000 52,000 mark, but progress is made in Italy, Spain, Austria and France. Governors start opening their states. Airlines begin to declare bankruptcy and the first tranche of first-quarter financial results are brutal. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for April 12-April 18, 2020

U.S. governors talk about when the states can reopen even as nationwide Coronavirus deaths surge past the 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 mark. Airlines whine about the terms of the bailout money they're getting from the nation's taxpayers. And only fools and self-important pundits know anything about the future of travel. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for April 5-April 11, 2020

Read all about it! As the world convulses with the waves of Coronavirus, the toll on the travel industry is revealed. Remaining flights are essentially empty, airports are shutting terminals and business travelers have nowhere to go--and aren't in a rush to get there. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for March 29-April 4, 2020

Read all about it! Domestic travel is down more than 90 percent from last year. More states impose stay-at-home orders. The death toll in Italy and Spain continues to skyrocket. And doctors and nurses are scrambling for supplies to help Coronavirus patients--and protect themselves. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for March 22-28, 2020

The new "new normal"? International transit airports barring transit passengers. U.S. states demanding arrivals from other U.S. states quarantine themselves on arrival. U.S. passenger volume dropping by 90 percent in a matter of days. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for March 15-21, 2020

Read all about it! The world is closing--and we watch in personal and transportation isolation. Countries are closing borders, airlines are all but shut and hotels are putting the keys in the door. Here's how we're covering it. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for March 8-14, 2020

Read all about it! Italy, Spain, France and Israel shut down. Other countries close their borders as the United States preps for what's to come. The Trump Administration botches the roll out of a ban on "all travel from Europe." U.S. carriers begin cutting service to the bone. Here's how it's happening. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for March 1-7, 2020

Read all about it! Italy emerges as the new Coronavirus hotspot so airlines begin making huge service cuts there. Meanwhile, Chinese airlines resume some flying. The chief rabbi of Israel says don't kiss the mezuzah. The travel industry starts tallying the financial damage. Here's how it's happening. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for February 15-29, 2020

Read all about it! The Coronavirus spreads around the globe. Japan, South Korea and Italy are hit hard and airlines quickly drop their flights. Tourism disappears and companies begin telling employees to curtail business travel. The Tokyo Summer Olympics may be threatened. Airlines begin rolling out gimmicky fee waivers to nervous flyers. Click here for the day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for February 1-14, 2020

Read all about it! The spread of the Coronavirus is still mostly affecting mainland China, but Hong Kong, Macao and Taiwan are losing flights and visitors, too. As Chinese tourists stay home, however, the travel industry learns how much they mean to airline traffic, cruise ships and hotels. Click here for day-to-day details.

Coronavirus Update for January 23-31, 2020

Read all about it! As the Coronavirus worsens, airlines have reacted by slashing service to Hong Kong and mainland China. Retailers and food-service giants such as McDonald's are closing locations, too. And neighboring countries are closing their borders. Click here for the day-to-day details.